Liverpool’s Croxteth Hall in need of ‘urgent’ repairs

Originally built in 1575, the Grade II-listed stately home was occupied by the aristocratic Molyneux family until 1972, and now needs £650,000 of urgent repair works. Tony McDonough reports

Croxteth Hall
Croxteth Hall in LIverpool was originally built in 1575

 

Senior Liverpool politicians are being asked to approve urgent repairs costing £650,000 for the city’s historic Croxteth Hall.

Originally built in 1575, the Grade II-listed stately home was occupied by the aristocratic Molyneux family until 1972 when it became a visitor attraction. It currently attracts around 600,000 visitors a year.

A report to Liverpool City Council’s virtual Cabinet meeting on Friday 3 July recommends essential work is undertaken to protect Croxteth Hall and its estate, which covers 500 acres close to West Derby Village. The centre of the village also boasts an Elizabethan courthouse.

The report recommends that urgent engineering and structural work to the Elizabethan hall must be carried out imminently – this includes repairs to chimney breasts, guttering, roof lining and the terrace.

If agreed, a tender process will begin with the aim to work with a contractor to undertake the repairs while the hall is closed due to the ongoing health pandemic. Improving the aesthetics of the Hall will also be a priority, and funding options will be explored which will improve signage, fencing, the front terrace and repairs to the stable yard.

As well of the hall, its attractions include  Croxteth Home Farm, a Victorian walled garden, riding centre, café, Jungle Parc and children’s adventure playground. In 2018 the council shelved plans to outsource the running of the hall to a private leisure operator.

Deputy Mayor and cabinet member for culture, tourism and events, Cllr Wendy Simon, said: “Croxteth Hall and estate are real unpolished jewels in our crown and we are now at the point where we need to carry out essential works in order to futureproof the hall.

This work will pave the way for us to explore all the options available which will ultimately attract new and existing visitors and generate an essential income which can be-reinvested in the hall and park.

You might also like More from author

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.